art-of-swords:

Twin Dao Swords

  • Dated: circa 18th century
  • Culture: Chinese
  • Medium: steel, copper, silk, wood, leather

Source: Copyright © 2014 Historical Arms & Armor

teaadventures:

Shang Dong peak, Mr. Lin’s bio organic farm growing Golden Guanyin and other varietals

Oh ninjas….

Oh ninjas….

stephengreencomics:

A little fan art from last Friday’s drawing meetup. I did this in my sketchbook, zip tones in PS

stephengreencomics:

A little fan art from last Friday’s drawing meetup. I did this in my sketchbook, zip tones in PS

art-of-swords:

Dao Sword

  • Dated: early 20th Century
  • Culture: Chinese
  • Measurements: length 90.5 cm

The sword has a slightly curved, single-edged, damask blade, with a double groove, engraved with the effigy of a dragon on a face and ideograms on the other. It features a flat, brass hilt of lobed shape with relieved border, decorated with bas-relieved floral motifs en suite with all other mounts. The grip is black, made of wood while the wooden scabbard comes with mounts decorated en suite.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Czerny’s International Auction House S.R.L.

Grandmaster Doc-Fai Wong cannot be moved by a 30 person push!
"本人黄徳辉成功的挑战了30个人连环接力推。I, Doc-Fai Wong successfully accepted the challenge of 30 persons’s push."

Many people will say there is not a huge difference from three to thirty people because the capacity of transfer decreases with each person. Not to say it isn’t hard, if you’ve ever tried being pushed by a group of people you know full well how important correct technique is. You gotta have root!

However, it is not only the feat of simply maintaining footing and position during the push, the true display of strength is in balancing the energy from the entire group, without redirection of energy, for a sustained amount of time… he didn’t let the line of pushing break. Think of it as like balancing a chopstick on your finger, it’s not that much of a weight difference if you add ten more chopsticks, but the ability to keep them connected and balanced is the real skill.

When we practice Tai Chi we first learn the full emphasis on being able to complete the movement from memory. Then we learn the importance of the transitions between the movements and work to keep them cohesive in terms of energy relative to the movements they bind. Then we find that even in the technique itself, we must focus on retaining consistent energy (no loss of intention) during small movements.

This is a drill for one of those small movements we typically overlook. The training is simple, but to properly benefit from the training we must first allow our mind to understand the goal and our body to put the time in to make it effective.

No doubt, you’ll have a ball…

What do you do when find a dozen shipping containers in the woods?
#ninjaskills

What do you do when find a dozen shipping containers in the woods?
#ninjaskills